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July 13, 2004

Comments

Dennis

Scott:

Lance might get all, or most, of the media attention since he's the one who wins. More to the point, I sometimes feel that the media, and their audience, have a poor understanding of how cycling really works. So I liked this post by Jennifer, explaining is always nice.

As Jennifer points out, the team splits the money (the mechanics and the other involved gets a share as well). I even think that Lance at least one year gave his cut the others, he makes enough money on his own.

I think some of Lance's team members will do a nice Tour as captains if they ever get the opportunity. Jose Azevedo and Floyd Landis are both great riders.

Dana VanDen Heuvel

Yes, cycling is a team sport, and that's what makes Lance so successful. Unlike previous tour winners, Lance does few other races, and he and the team strategically focus on this event due to Lance's position in the cycling universe, his unique ability, focus, and drive to win this race, and the dynamics of cycling, much like in business, which state that you should not have 9 CEOs out in front, but rather, 1 CEO, and a lot of great, strong, dedicated managers to see that he can be 100% effective at his job.

jennifer rice

From what I understand, Lance splits the winnings with the team... they can also go for stage wins, or pass around the yellow jersey between team members at different stages. The team members probably wouldn't have a chance to win (or even be invited to participate in the Tour) if it weren't for Lance, because they're not as strong all-around (sprinting, mountains, long-haul)... so by hitching themselves to a star, they have greater opportunity for some glory and $$ in the Tour. That's my take on it so far, anyway...

According to Cycling News, the slipstream is "the still air behind a rider. At racing speeds most of a rider's effort goes into overcoming air resistance, and it's therefore significantly easier to ride in the slipstream of another rider than to break the air yourself."

For anyone who's interested in learning more about the Tour, check out the following links:
Tour FAQs: http://www.cyclingnews.com/road/2004/tour04/?id=features/FAQ
Tour Highlights: http://ww2.olntv.com/tdf04/

Scott Miller

Since cycling is such a team effort, why is it, then, that Lance gets all the credit and the Big Trophy at the end? It's as if the rest of his team sacrifice themselves for Lance's glory. This part doesn't sit well with me, and you see parallels in the biz world, too.

BTW, Jennifer, small point... the slipstream behind a cyclist, race car or 747 is turbulent air, which makes it easier to move through by vehicle close behind. Still air is more difficult to push aside as you move through it.

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