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April 19, 2007

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» ROI Integrated Campaigns: Commoditizing the Client-Agency Relationship? from Emergence Media
Note: Not many marketing blogs talk about client-agency relationships, so I thought Id take a stab at it Client-Agency Relationships: Now a Two-Way Street on Breaking Up Via Whats Your Brand Mantra?, From the Wall Street Journal... [Read More]

Comments

Internet Marketing Company

Client/agency relationships are not easy. After 11 years in the internet advertising business, I am rarely shocked by anything a client says or does. There are so many forces at work in this type of relationship, it is nearly impossible to figure out how to make these relationships work every time. At Endai Worldwide, we decided many years ago that we would stay focused on three simple principals: ask "what's the value", do "whatever it takes to reach the goal" and "trust- our most precious commodity".

Stay focused on how you add value to the relationship. Amazingly when you are adding value and generating revenue, clients love you.

Christina Gunn

On the client end, I have to say that agencies tend to forget that their clients need to be profitable. So when their clients are not seeing bottom line results, they cannot continue to afford alloacting dollars that are not proven. Perhaps the agencies need to come up with better ways to demonstrate short terms wins rather than complaining their clients don't understand the long term impact and the cost of change in direction. Sure we get it takes investment in the long run - but there has to be some tangible gains along the way.

Ted Heighington

Ad agencies forget they are in the business development business and not the creative business! Too often agencies do not connect their clients' operating strategies to their creative recommendations, nor are their concept recommendations fee payments linked to resulting sales performance like those of a client Marketing Manager. Further eroding the confidence and longevity of agency relationships is their reckless recruitment of young, affable and attractive personnel who have very little or non-existent business depth or breadth. Compounding client relationship stress is the 'bait and switch' staffing strategy, where the senior partners pitch the account and then switch much of the daily servicing to 'hand-holding' juniors. If agencies want to be really clever and creative, and win 'awards of respect' from their clients, they need to bulk up their senior ranks and put them on the client front line more often.

Pepita

Very insightful post and it is good to have my Feedreader filled by your posts once again!

To this post I would like to add two of my ThinkingSparks:
1. What are the consequences if a sequence of CMO's and their respective new brand positionings for the internal branding perspective? I envision this zigzagging troupe of employees....
2. Related to that: With the employee being so important to the brand are ad agencies the ones to hire when building a brand? If they do not even have the senior staff for their conventional business, how can they have the insights to building a brand through employees?

Daniel R

Jennifer,

Great heads-up on the WSJ article.

Speaking with online marketers at the Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco, this trend is all across the line with many client-agency relationship.

I think that that the ability to do analytics/ROI online has provided a false sense of the ability to conduct complete tracking and confusing short-term ROI against long-term ROI.

Agencies need to go a long way on trying to persuade/educate the client at all levels and to ensure that the agency understands the pressure coming to C-level folks from shareholders or other financial stakeholders.

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